Hi, I'm Thomas

NYC-based developer, student, and CS enthusiast.

Reimplementing data structures in Java

13 May 2021

View project on GitHub

Set

The set is backed by a Map that stores elements as keys and sets all values to be false. This is actually how the Java HashSet works! As with the hash-map, all three set operations (insert, contains, delete) have runtime O(1)\mathcal O(1) by design.

Map

The map is implemented as a hash-map. All four map operations (insert, delete, get, hasKey) have runtime O(1)\mathcal O(1) by design.

Queue

The queue is implemented as a subclass of DoublyLinkedList. All five queue operations (offer, remove, poll, element, peek) have runtime O(1)\mathcal O(1) by design.

Stack

The stack is implemented as a subclass of DoublyLinkedList. All four stack operations (push, pop, peek, empty) have runtime O(1)\mathcal O(1) by design.

Doubly-linked list

Unlike singly-linked nodes, doubly-linked nodes keep track of their predecessor (in addition to their successor). This makes reverse traversal an operation that runs in O(1)\mathcal O(1) time. It also allows for much more concise code because it eliminates the need to keep track of the preceding node while iterating over the list (once the target is found, it stores a pointer to the previous node). Searching for an element or indexing is still O(n)\mathcal O(n).

Singly-linked list

Singly-linked nodes only keep track of their successor so there is no easy way to iterate backward. Certain operations are O(n)\mathcal O(n) instead of O(1)\mathcal O(1) because to find a preceding node one must iterate from the start of the list.